Atomic Cleanup Help Wanted

DNA-Patch

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our Original Mission was to relocate radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Atomic Cleanup Help Wanted – The Defense Nuclear Agency is looking for personnel required to clean up radioactive debris and soils contaminating 40 islands in the Marshall Islands located in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean known from 1946 – 1958 as the Pacific Proving Grounds for the U.S. Nuclear Test Era directed by the Atomic Energy Commission.
Forty-three atomic bombs were tested at Enewetak Atoll leaving behind radioactive fallout and debris from over 1100 megatons of yield created by detonating Americium-241, Cesium-137, Cobalt-60, Plutonium-239, Plutonium-240, Strontium-90 and other radioactive elements.
One hour accumulated background radiation levels vary depending on said island. Three of the 40 islands show 62,849 R/h on Runit Island, 3,501 R/h on Enjebi Island, and 651 R/h at the Lojwa Island Base Camp.
The Defense Nuclear Agency has been authorized by the U.S. Federal Government to hire personnel from government approved private sector contractors, various federal government agencies, a government approved marine biology lab, and volunteers from current members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. No hazardous duty pay will be provided. No special health insurance shall be provided. A modest per Diem pay (less daily expenses) shall be provided. Military Transportation shall be provided. Housing (IE: tents with cots, temporary structures with metal bunk-beds and wall lockers, furnished trailers, furnished permanent structures) shall be provided. Meals shall be provided. Laundry shall be provided. Limited medical care shall be provided.
Participants are expected to work ten to twelve hour days, six days a week for the average 179 day assignment. Radiation protective gear (IE: none, painters masks, gas masks, or full radiation suits and equipment) shall be provided.
Amenities include living on at least one of the secluded tropical islands with fantastic views of starlit skies, Pacific Ocean sunrises and Enewetak Atoll’s beautiful lagoon sunsets. Free waterfront activities include: 24 hour day or night waterfront walks or sitting on the beach, watching the waves, collecting shells, watching sea-life (IE: sharks, dolphins, whales, flying fish, parrot-fish, lobsters, etc), fishing for sharks, swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, spearfishing, 12′ sunfish sailing, catamaran sailing, military boat and helicopter rides.) Other amenities may or may not include: retail stores, outdoor theaters, local broadcast television, local broadcast radio, USO Shows, baseball games, jogging, weight lift equipment, barbershop, pool tables, clubhouses, outdoor grilling, rat stomping and lots of parties.
Other than the provided postal mail system, opportunities to converse with families and friends will be rare. No family members will be allowed to visit. All information about the atomic cleanup mission shall remain confidential until an undisclosed date.
Applicants shall be aware that this mission is the last and final stage of the Atomic Test Program which began as the Manhattan Project and is a part of the Human Radiation Experiment Program.
Job positions required include but is not limited to radiation testing personnel, construction skilled and semi-skilled laborers who will locate and hand carry radioactive debris to one of several designated areas for disposal, concrete workers, framers, plumbers, electricians, machinists, heavy equipment operators, dump truck operators, boat operators, helicopter crew members, demolition experts, explosive ordinance experts, crane operators, LARC crew members, medical staff, cafeteria staff, supply personnel, laundry staff, security personnel, operations and administrative personnel.
Applicants shall be contacted by their employers or military superiors for an opportunity to volunteer or will be voluntold to participate in this confidential mission. Upon completion of the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission, most participants (including state side personnel required to record radiation readings from urine samples collected from cleanup participants) shall be awarded the Humanitarian Medal from the U.S. Government as a gesture of thanks for putting yourself in harms way while preparing the islands for the return of the people who lived at Enewetak Atoll before the atomic tests began.
Please be aware that although most health complications caused by exposure to ionized radiation may not be detected for up to 30 to 50 years after exposure, no long term health care studies will be provided after your participation of the mission. Classified documents including personnel records, health records, radiation records, and other documents will be maintained by the U.S. Federal Government and will not be accessible or will have limited access in the future.

The above advertisement is a piece of pure fiction. It was never posted by anyone or any government agency prior to this publication. It was written as if the truth in advertising and full disclosure were standard operational procedures and was practiced for classified government and military operations.

The content however, is closer to the truth than what was commonly disclosed prior to most volunteering or being “voluntold” to participate in the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission.

I was one of the few from the 8,000+ participants who volunteered. In fact, I volunteered twice for a total of 14 months at Enewetak Atoll. Most of the Atomic Cleanup Veterans were voluntold to participate in the mission.

I’m one of the lucky veterans who served at the atoll with limited health complications. I’ve met many who are struggling with health challenges. Our roster survey shows about one-third state they have no health challenges. However, two-thirds believe we are experiencing health challenges due to our exposure to ionizing radiation.

The government refuses to admit our exposure to radiation during the cleanup mission was considered a “radiation-risk” activity. The government continues to state our exposure to radiation was “occupational” in nature.

Please write your federal representative and let them know you support our efforts to change the current laws by including the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Veterans as Atomic Veterans (as defined in RECA) as experiencing radiation risk exposure to radiation.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories written by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Search and Rescue Mission – Day 32

Kevin-Bruce-Aldrich-Bartlett-21

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times of our declining health.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

We have a new mission. However, this time, it is your choice to accept or refuse this mission.

As of Day 32, we have 44 brothers on our list of atomic cleanup veterans to locate from the nine Atomic Cleanup Brothers who accepted our mission to list those we remember from our mission. Plus the brother of one of our fallen Atomic Cleanup Brothers has requested more information about his older brother who died during our mission. I believe he deserves answers.

I am happy to report one of the veterans listed on our Remembered Atomic Cleanup Veterans List has found us and signed our Roster of Known Survivors.

Dan Collins has found us. He was the C Company Commander of the 84th Engineer Battalion during the beginning of the mission in 1977 and returned as the Lojwa Operations Officer later in the mission.

Some of our memories have blurred over the years. It is ok to provide partial information and misspelled names. We can correct the information as our information grows.

You too are encouraged to list every 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission Participant you remember.

Review this list of 44 remembered atomic cleanup veterans and let us know what you can contribute to our knowledge database.

  • Aguon, David E., SSG, last seen 1992, CSM, Karlsruhe, Germany [dc 10/27/2014]
  • Behrens, Maj, Army, S3 Operations Officer, 84th Engineer Battalion, Enewetak, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1978
  • Bourne, Robert, SGT, A Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, drove transit truck and operated crane late 1979 – 1980 [wok 10/26/2014]
  • Bruce, Guy, Manager, Holmes & Narver, last known location was Andalusia, Alabama, last contact via phone by gfb3 ~2004
  • Butler, Hugh T. “Motor Mouth” – Navy, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Buzzard, Lt, Army, S3 Operations, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Castle, Art, Army, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1980
  • Chadwell, Mike, Army, 12B10, B Company, 65th Combat Engineer Battalion, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Enewetak, Lowja-Sep. 1978 -Feb. 1979 Worked at batch plants as a bagger. – last seen by kbb at Lojwa February 1979
  • Cofran, Lee “Butcher”, Navy?, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Collins, Danny, Army, Cpt, C Company Commander, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 on the internet ~2000 [Update: Dan Collins signed our roster 11/19/2014.]
  • Devault, Joseph, CWO [smr 11/7/2014]
  • Foland, Michael, CPT, A Company Commander, 84th Engineer Battalion, arrived late 1979 – 1980 [wok 10/26/2014]
  • Gallerane, Mark G. “Maddog” – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Green, “Cotton Top”, Army, 1st SGT, C Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, (kept his word that if I volunteered to go to Enewetak, I would do drafting work at Enewetak after Cpt Collins wanted me to go to Lojwa. Top Green arranged my transfer to headquarters s3 – gfb3), last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1980
  • Haliczer, Douglas “Oak Loaf” – 1979, 43rd Engineer Company, Fort Bliss Texas, last seen 1980 [dc 10/27/2014]
  • Huffman, Eugene “Bruce”, Army, Draftsman, S3 Operations, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1979
  • Jarvis. Timothy Paul – US Army Corps of Engineers, 1977-78, Enewetak Atoll, Reported “deceased” to our family in December, 1978. We were told “he was lost at sea, and his remains were unrecoverable.” However, have always believed he was involved in a radiation accident. 8.) 5′ 10″, blonde hair, blue eyes, his rank was private, promoted to corp at death. He was stationed in HI, just prior to being sent to the Marshall Islands. 9.) I am his younger brother, I was in the 7th grade when he died, now I’m 47. We never received his body. Are family was told by the US Government to stop communication with other families, whose son’s were supposedly lost at sea with my brother. That’s why we never believed his death was the result of a sailing accident. [ci 11/8/2014]
  • Kehe(sp?), Ernest, Army, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Krouse, Frank, Army, Mail Clerk, JTG, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Lang, Ronald W. “Bandit” – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Lewis, Army, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1980
  • Martin, Dan (Marty), Army, Lojwa, A Company, 84th Engineer Battalion [sh 10/27/2014]
  • Mattlab, Wheeler, SSG, last seen 1979 [dc 10/27/2014]
  • Morgan, Wendell “Mongoose” – Air Force? 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Neel, Gary D. – 1979, 43rd Engineer Company, Fort Bliss, Texas, last seen early 1980’s [dc 10/27/2014]
  • Pearson, SGT, Army, Squad Leader, B Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, Lojwa [sh 1027/2014]
  • Perry, Robert from Texas [mb 10/26/2014]
  • Pinegar, Ron, SGT, A Co, ran batch plant, stateside unit was 8th EN, 1CD late 1979 – 1980 [wok 10/26/2014]
  • Riggs, Gene “Rags” – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Roberts, O.C. “Black Beauty” – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Robertson, Harrol L. “Easy Rider” – first name may be Harold – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Simpson, Bob “Scrapper”, Army, B Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, Arrived and left with gcp (Apr to Oct 79), 62E10 (Heavy Junk Operator), last I knew he returned to his unit in Panama Christmas of 79, We were brothers from different mothers; The picture I posted of me holding a bottle of Bacardi, Bob is the other guy holding a fifth. – last seen by gcp ~1979
  • Singer, SSG, Army, Lojwa, Platoon SGT, B Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, Lojwa [sh 10/27/2014]
  • Spooner, John A. – Navy, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Stafanco, Richard, (5th Grp SF) Army, Lojwa B Company, 84th Engineer Battalion [sh 10/27/2014]
  • Stein, Lee, CWO [smr 11/7/2014]
  • Suzzo, Frank, unknown branch, last known location: Myrtle Beach, SC – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Tracey, Sean II “Sleeper” – Medic, Fort Hood, Texas – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Tucker, Col, Army, Commander, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1978
  • Ulrigg, Ron “Warrior”, Killeen, Texas – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]
  • Verdugo, first name unknown, 43rd Engineer Company, Fort Bliss, Texas [dc 10/27/2014]
  • Walker, Ken, Army, Administration, JTG, (gfb3 enjoyed many scuba dives with Ken – at least one involved sharks), last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Wolfe, first name unknown [dc 10/27/2014]
  • Yoakum. Marc “Mammy” – Army, 1979, Lojwa [gcp 10/27/2014]

The above information was provided by the first nine who accepted the challenge to participate in our Search and Rescue Mission: Charles Ikner (ci), Daniel Cisneros (dc), Gary Pulis (gcp), Girard Bolton (gfb3), Kevin Bartlett (kbb), Michael Boyd (mb), Steve “Harry” Harrison (sh), Steven Rebbe (sf), and Wm. O. Keller (wok).

It is our hope to find as many of the 8,000+ participants of the atomic cleanup mission as possible.

You to can fill out as much of the information requested in the form below. No worries if you only remember partial info. We can add your info to others who accept this mission.

Within a short time, we should have an overabundance of information. Then the real work begins.

Decide now to help find every “Lojwa Animal”, “Runit Rat”, “Medren Rat”, etc.. you remember from “The Rock” or more commonly known as Enewetak Atoll.

Your Mission Continues Now.

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Participants in the U.S. Government’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 Atomic Debris Cleanup Participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) of the 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Search and Rescue Mission – Day 4

 

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Ken Walker, Administration, JTG, Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands, ~1979

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times of our declining health.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

We have a new mission. However, this time, it is your choice to accept or refuse this mission.

As of Day 4 of our new Search and Rescue (our memories) Mission, three of our Atomic Cleanup Brothers accepted our mission.

You too are encouraged to list every 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission Participant you remember.

Some of our memories have blurred over the years. It is ok to provide partial information and misspelled names. We can correct the information as our information grows.

Review this list of remembered atomic cleanup veterans and let us know what you can contribute to our knowledge database.

  • Behrens, Maj, Army, S3 Operations Officer, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1978
  • Bruce, Guy, Manager, Holmes & Narver, last known location was Andalusia, Alabama, last contact via phone by gfb3 ~2004
  • Buzzard, Lt, Army, S3 Operations, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Castle, Art, Army, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1980
  • Chadwell, Mike, Army, 12B10, B Company, 65th Combat Engineer Battalion, Schofield Barracks, Hawaii. Enewetak, Lowja-Sep. 1978 -Feb. 1979 Worked at batch plants as a bagger. – last seen by kbb at Lojwa February 1979
  • Collins, Danny, Army, Cpt, C Company Commander, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 on the internet ~2000
  • Green, “Top”, Army, C Company 1st Sgt, 84th Engineer Battalion, (kept his word that if I volunteered to go to Enewetak, I would do drafting work at Enewetak after Cpt Collins wanted me to go to Lojwa. Top Green arranged my transfer to headquarters s3 – gfb3), last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1980
  • Huffman, Eugene “Bruce”, Army, Draftsman, S3 Operations, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1979
  • Kehe(sp?), Ernest, Army, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Krouse, Frank, Army, Mail Clerk, JTG, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979
  • Lewis, Army, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Hawaii ~1980
  • Simpson, Bob “Scrapper”, Army, B Company, 84th Engineer Battalion, Arrived and left with gcp (Apr to Oct 79), 62E10 (Heavy Junk Operator), last I knew he returned to his unit in Panama Christmas of 79, We were brothers from different mothers; The picture I posted of me holding a bottle of Bacardi, Bob is the other guy holding a fifth. – last seen by gcp ~1979
  • Tucker, Col, Army, Commander, 84th Engineer Battalion, last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1978
  • Walker, Ken, Army, Administration, JTG, (gfb3 enjoyed many scuba dives with Ken – at least one involved sharks), last seen by gfb3 at Enewetak ~1979

The above information was provided by the first three who accepted the challenge to participate in our Search and Rescue Mission: Gary Pulis (gcp), Girard Bolton (gfb3) and Kevin Bartlett (kbb).

It is our hope to find as many of the 8,000+ participants of the atomic cleanup mission as possible.

You to can fill out as much of the information requested in the form below. No worries if you only remember partial info. We can add your info to others who accept this mission.

Within a short time, we should have an overabundance of information. Then the real work begins.

Decide now to help find every “Lojwa Animal”, “Runit Rat”, “Medren Rat”, etc.. you remember from “The Rock” or more commonly known as Enewetak Atoll.

Your Mission Continues Now.

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Participants in the U.S. Government’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 Atomic Debris Cleanup Participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) of the 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Search and Rescue Mission

Al-Gettier-Lojwa-base-camp-03

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times of our declining health.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

We have a new mission. However, this time, it is your choice to accept or refuse this mission.

You are encouraged to list every 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission Participant you remember.

The information you provide will help us account for every person who put their’s and their family’s health at risk because of exposure to ionizing radiation during the cleanup mission.

It is our hope to find as many of the 8,000+ participants of the atomic cleanup mission as possible.

Fill out as much of the information requested in the form below. No worries if you only remember partial info. We can add your info to others who accept this mission.

Within a short time, we should have an overabundance of information. Then the real work begins.

The next step is to form a volunteer group to start searching the internet for everyone listed.

Decide now to help find every “Lojwa Animal”, “Runit Rat”, “Medren Rat”, etc.. you remember from “The Rock” or more commonly known as Enewetak Atoll.

Your Mission Begins Now.

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Participants in the U.S. Government’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 Atomic Debris Cleanup Participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) of the 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Glossary: Lojwa Animal

Lojwa Animals Identification Chart

Lojwa Animals Identification Chart

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our Original Mission was to remove radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

We understand most people have no clue as to the meanings of many of the words and phrases we use when we refer to our experiences at Enewetak Atoll.

That is why we decided to create a Glossary of Words and Phrases that can help reduce the confusion while you visit AtomicCleanupVets.com

We seem to get the most blank stares and looks of bewilderment when we say most of the soldiers and civilians at Enewetak Atoll were Lojwa Animals.

Here are some important facts and opinions about Lojwa Animals:

  • The atomic cleanup mission’s base camp for heavy equipment operators and manual labor force soldiers was housed on the island of Lojwa.
  • Most of the buildings on the island were wood framed on concrete slabs with tin covered walls and roofs.
  • Those who cleared Lojwa Island of vegetation and built the structures slept on cots in tents during that phase of the mission.
  • Soldiers were scheduled to work 6 days a week, 10 hours each day, during their nearly six month TDY tours.
  • Temperatures dropped below 100 degrees at night
  • Many of the soldiers who lived on Lojwa compared the hard labor of cleaning Enewetak Atoll to the age-old stories of prison chain gangs.
  • The popular consensus was that prisoners could not be used to perform the work because it would be considered inhumane.
  • Unless I am mistaken, no one knows who first coined the phrase “Lojwa Animal.”
  • The soldiers who called themselves Lojwa Animals felt as if they were being treated as animals. The phrase stuck.
  • T-shirts were made. Jokes and stories were exchanged. Beer was bought. Fights happened. Everyone worked together the day after.

There are more phrases and words needing to be explained but only one per post as we build our Glossary for better understanding.

We joke for stress relief. But we worked hard and took pride in what we accomplished. Most peacetime construction work in the military were training exercises. This project had meaning. We actually got to do real work using the skills we were taught to do.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories written by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Atomic Cleanup Veteran Roster Signup

Cactus Crater

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times of our declining health.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

The growth of the internet has allowed people scattered all over the world to connect with a few simple commands on our internet enabled devices.

Enewetak Soldiers, Lojwa Animals and Runit Rats have reconnected on Facebook and Blogs and other Internet based communities ever since they started appearing on the internet.

We had a mission. We bonded. We did our jobs. We served. Now our country seems to have abandoned us as though they never knew our names.

Our names were entombed in the Cactus Crater, but seemingly no where else. One by One, we can recreate our list of Atomic Cleanup Participants by filling out the survey below.

Don’t worry if you don’t remember some info or do not have much time to fill out your information. You can go back and add or edit your information at a later date if you so desire.

After you have submitted your information, please share this page with other Atomic Cleanup Veterans so they may add their names along with those we have already found.

The information you submit (except for email addresses) will be posted in a ROSTER of ENEWETAK ATOLL ATOMIC CLEANUP VETERANS.


We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Participants in the U.S. Government’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 Atomic Debris Cleanup Participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) of the 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Remember Enewetak! 3-16-1980

60-Minutes visited Enewetak.

60-Minutes visited Enewetak.

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

The Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission caught the attention of 60 minutes.

Morley Safer visited the atoll to gain some insight into what was in store for the native peoples when they move back to their homeland.

His investigative questions and comments are eye openers. Some of his statements make me want to dig in deeper for more info.

Morley Safer got the grand tour of the islands while we were still cleaning up the radioactive soils and debris.

Notice the uniforms and dust and piles of radioactive junk seen in this March 16, 1980 broadcast of CBSNEWS 60 Minutes.

Almost every Atomic Cleanup Veteran worked 10 hour days, 6 days every week for about 6 months. Some served two tours and/or extended.

The Cleanup Mission was a joint task of the U.S. Department of Defense. Navy, Air Force, and Army Soldiers participated in the cleanup mission.

Our meals, laundry, and other services at Enewetak Atoll were provided by Holmes and Narver, a private contractor. Even though they did not move soils nor debris, they were no strangers to the heat and the radiation at the atoll.

One of those H&N kitchen staff members, George Kleb, was lucky enough to get his photo (above) taken with Morley Safer and his associate producer after eating lunch in the Lojwa mess hall.

Watch the investigative report so you too may gain some insight into our plight and take action. Share. Inform. Comment. Inquire. Support.

[Note: If you are unable to view the video you can watch it at CBS News http://www.cbsnews.com/videos/remember-enewetak/ ]

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include all Marshall Island Atomic Cleanup Veterans in the U.S. Government Veterans Administration’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Thanks goes to George Kleb for sharing the photograph of him standing between Morley Safer and his associate producer.

Credit goes to CBSNEWS for allowing us to share this episode of 60 Minutes with our supporters.