Please Sign and Share Our White House Petition (Expired 10/15/2015)

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our Original Mission was to relocate radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

We accomplished our Humanitarian Mission in 1980. Currently, some of us have health challenges.

On September 13th, 2015, we took the initiative to create a White House Petition so the President can be made aware of our challenges and take steps required by Congress to change the law.

After creating our petition, we were made aware that we had a hard deadline of obtaining 100,000 signatures before the President would be informed of our petition.

We found out the White House policy is, if we cannot obtain 100,000 signatures within one month, our petition is removed along with all our signatures and we have to start all over at ZERO.

We encourage you to read, learn and the act on our petition NOW. Our deadline is October 13, 2015.

(MISSION FAILED: ARCHIVED BY THE WHITE HOUSE 10/15/2015 WITH 342 SIGNATURES.)

This is our White House Petition:

WE PETITION THE OBAMA ADMINISTRATION TO:

Add 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Veterans to the “Atomic Veterans” definition by the Veterans Administration.

Atomic Cleanup Veterans are not currently considered as experiencing “at-risk” exposure to radiation while relocating radioactive materials contaminated by 43 atomic tests at Enewetak Atoll.

Urge Congress & Veterans Affairs to include within the definition of “Atomic Veterans” the Veterans involved in the Atomic Debris Cleanup of the United States Nuclear Test Site at Enewetak Atoll from 1977 to 1980 making them eligible to receive compensation and health care benefits from the United States Government as specified in the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act.

The Radiation Exposure Compensation Act (“the Act” or “RECA”), 42 U.S.C. § 2210 note (2012) established an administrative program for claims relating to atmospheric nuclear testing and claims relating to uranium industry employment.

We do not expect anyone to blindly sign our petition without knowing our backstory.

We have been fortunate to have gained the attention of several news agencies.

Read the most recent article from a weekly newspaper in Mobile, Alabama called Lagnaippe at http://bit.ly/LagniappeEnewetak

Stars and Stripes Magazine republished a great article written by Abigail Curtis of Bangor Daily News in Maine on 3/24/2015 http://goo.gl/289NYC

On 8/15/2015, KITV 4 News released their story about us in Hawaii http://bit.ly/1NaDXAQ

These are not the only stories news agencies have produced about our current situation.

As much as we appreciate our increased exposure to the general public, we need your help and need your actions to be a top priority.

We’ve been asked “How can I Help?” from most every supporter who takes an interest in our group of Atomic Cleanup Veterans.

Here is a list of “To Do Items” that makes it easy for you to help us in the quickest amount of time:

  1. Sign Our White House Petition at wh.gov/inXsb
  2. Share wh.gov/inXsb on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ & the rest of the internet social networks where you have influential connections.
  3. Write your local newspapers and ask them to share our petition with their subscribers in their publications.
  4. Call your local television and radio stations and ask them to share our White House Petition with their dedicated audience.
  5. Contact your local military & veterans’ associations & ask them to encourage their members to sign our petition.
  6. Ask your friends and associates to sign our petition.
  7. Ask your spouses, adult children, brothers, sisters, aunts, uncles, cousins, grandparents, adult grandchildren and other loved ones to sign our petition so the White House Administration can act on our behalf.
  8. Contact your Federal Senator: Senate.gov/senators/contact/ and share our wh.gov/inXsb White House Petition Link.
  9. Contact your Federal Representative: House.gov/representatives/find/ and share our wh.gov/inXsb White House Petition Link.
  10. Please return to our White House Petition and tell us (in our comments) which signature number they assigned to you at wh.gov/inXsb

Remember: The government refuses to admit our exposure to radiation during the cleanup mission was considered a “radiation-risk” activity. The government continues to state our exposure to radiation was “occupational” in nature. With your signature, we are one step closer to obtaining the health care some of our group members desperately need.

Please write your federal representative and let them know you support our efforts to change the current laws by including the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Veterans as Atomic Veterans (as defined in RECA) as experiencing radiation risk exposure to radiation.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories written by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Atomic Cleanup Help Wanted

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We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our Original Mission was to relocate radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Atomic Cleanup Help Wanted – The Defense Nuclear Agency is looking for personnel required to clean up radioactive debris and soils contaminating 40 islands in the Marshall Islands located in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean known from 1946 – 1958 as the Pacific Proving Grounds for the U.S. Nuclear Test Era directed by the Atomic Energy Commission.
Forty-three atomic bombs were tested at Enewetak Atoll leaving behind radioactive fallout and debris from over 1100 megatons of yield created by detonating Americium-241, Cesium-137, Cobalt-60, Plutonium-239, Plutonium-240, Strontium-90 and other radioactive elements.
One hour accumulated background radiation levels vary depending on said island. Three of the 40 islands show 62,849 R/h on Runit Island, 3,501 R/h on Enjebi Island, and 651 R/h at the Lojwa Island Base Camp.
The Defense Nuclear Agency has been authorized by the U.S. Federal Government to hire personnel from government approved private sector contractors, various federal government agencies, a government approved marine biology lab, and volunteers from current members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. No hazardous duty pay will be provided. No special health insurance shall be provided. A modest per Diem pay (less daily expenses) shall be provided. Military Transportation shall be provided. Housing (IE: tents with cots, temporary structures with metal bunk-beds and wall lockers, furnished trailers, furnished permanent structures) shall be provided. Meals shall be provided. Laundry shall be provided. Limited medical care shall be provided.
Participants are expected to work ten to twelve hour days, six days a week for the average 179 day assignment. Radiation protective gear (IE: none, painters masks, gas masks, or full radiation suits and equipment) shall be provided.
Amenities include living on at least one of the secluded tropical islands with fantastic views of starlit skies, Pacific Ocean sunrises and Enewetak Atoll’s beautiful lagoon sunsets. Free waterfront activities include: 24 hour day or night waterfront walks or sitting on the beach, watching the waves, collecting shells, watching sea-life (IE: sharks, dolphins, whales, flying fish, parrot-fish, lobsters, etc), fishing for sharks, swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, spearfishing, 12′ sunfish sailing, catamaran sailing, military boat and helicopter rides.) Other amenities may or may not include: retail stores, outdoor theaters, local broadcast television, local broadcast radio, USO Shows, baseball games, jogging, weight lift equipment, barbershop, pool tables, clubhouses, outdoor grilling, rat stomping and lots of parties.
Other than the provided postal mail system, opportunities to converse with families and friends will be rare. No family members will be allowed to visit. All information about the atomic cleanup mission shall remain confidential until an undisclosed date.
Applicants shall be aware that this mission is the last and final stage of the Atomic Test Program which began as the Manhattan Project and is a part of the Human Radiation Experiment Program.
Job positions required include but is not limited to radiation testing personnel, construction skilled and semi-skilled laborers who will locate and hand carry radioactive debris to one of several designated areas for disposal, concrete workers, framers, plumbers, electricians, machinists, heavy equipment operators, dump truck operators, boat operators, helicopter crew members, demolition experts, explosive ordinance experts, crane operators, LARC crew members, medical staff, cafeteria staff, supply personnel, laundry staff, security personnel, operations and administrative personnel.
Applicants shall be contacted by their employers or military superiors for an opportunity to volunteer or will be voluntold to participate in this confidential mission. Upon completion of the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission, most participants (including state side personnel required to record radiation readings from urine samples collected from cleanup participants) shall be awarded the Humanitarian Medal from the U.S. Government as a gesture of thanks for putting yourself in harms way while preparing the islands for the return of the people who lived at Enewetak Atoll before the atomic tests began.
Please be aware that although most health complications caused by exposure to ionized radiation may not be detected for up to 30 to 50 years after exposure, no long term health care studies will be provided after your participation of the mission. Classified documents including personnel records, health records, radiation records, and other documents will be maintained by the U.S. Federal Government and will not be accessible or will have limited access in the future.

The above advertisement is a piece of pure fiction. It was never posted by anyone or any government agency prior to this publication. It was written as if the truth in advertising and full disclosure were standard operational procedures and was practiced for classified government and military operations.

The content however, is closer to the truth than what was commonly disclosed prior to most volunteering or being “voluntold” to participate in the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission.

I was one of the few from the 8,000+ participants who volunteered. In fact, I volunteered twice for a total of 14 months at Enewetak Atoll. Most of the Atomic Cleanup Veterans were voluntold to participate in the mission.

I’m one of the lucky veterans who served at the atoll with limited health complications. I’ve met many who are struggling with health challenges. Our roster survey shows about one-third state they have no health challenges. However, two-thirds believe we are experiencing health challenges due to our exposure to ionizing radiation.

The government refuses to admit our exposure to radiation during the cleanup mission was considered a “radiation-risk” activity. The government continues to state our exposure to radiation was “occupational” in nature.

Please write your federal representative and let them know you support our efforts to change the current laws by including the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Veterans as Atomic Veterans (as defined in RECA) as experiencing radiation risk exposure to radiation.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories written by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

X-Ray Day – Enewetak Atoll Atomic Test #1

 

AbombOperationSandstoneApril1948

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the atomic cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

This article is written to honor and respect the soldiers who were assigned to participate and experience the Manhattan Project Tests in the Pacific Proving Grounds at Enewetak Atoll. The Veterans Administration has designated them as Atomic Veterans. They felt the heat and the shock-wave and the radioactive fallout from the nuclear tests.

National Atomic Veterans’ Day is 16 July 2014 and we aim to celebrate and understand that day by sharing government films and documents which were considered top-secret during the Cold War.

We have learned much from the challenges Atomic Veterans have encountered with health complications, dealing with the Veterans Administration and the U.S. Government.

The Atomic Veterans were forced to take legal action against the U.S. Government and the U.S. Justice Department stepped in and judged in favor of the Atomic Veterans.

There were over 40 atomic tests performed at Enewetak Atoll. Operation Sandstone’s X-Ray Day Nuclear Device was the first to be tested at Enewetak Atoll.

Our Mission was to clean the debris left behind by this nuclear test and the rest of the bombs that detonated and left radioactive fallout on the islands and in the lagoon at Enewetak Atoll.

Briefing Summary

  • Enewetak Atoll Atomic Test #1
  • Manhattan Project Test #4
  • U.S. Atomic Bomb #6
  • Date: 4/14/1948
  • Time: 18:16:59.0
  • Operation: Sandstone – DOE – Department of Energy
  • Test: X-Ray

  • Sponsor: LANL – Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • Location: West Tip of Engebi aka Janet Island, Enewetak Atoll
  • Latitude: 11.66276° N
  • Longitude: 162.23785° E

  • Surface Elevation: 200’ Tower
  • Type: Tower
  • Purpose: Weapons Related
  • Device: Mk-3 Type B Levitated
  • Yield Range: 37kt
  • Venting: I-131 venting detected, 140 kCi (5200 TBq) Note: 2:1 oralloy-plutonium, levitated core. Levitation was considered a top secret technique until 1980.

Documents:

Glossary:                            

  • DOE – Department of Energy
  • DOE/NV – Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office
  • kt – 1kt = 1,000 tons of TNT. The total effective energy released in a nuclear explosion. It is usually expressed in terms of equivalent tonnage of TNT required to produce the same energy release in an explosion.
  • LANL – Los Alamos National Laboratory
  • Tower – A nuclear device mounted at the top of a steel or wooden tower and exploded in the atmosphere.

National Association of Atomic Veterans, Inc. ( A Non-profit Veteran’s Assistance Organization ) is a group dedicated to help the 1944-1977 Atomic Veterans and, more recently, to help the 1977-1980 Atomic Cleanup Veterans. The NAAV’s website can be found at http://naav.com/

Their mission statement says: “NAAV  was founded in August, 1979 by the late Orville E. Kelly ( of Burlington, Iowa ) for the purposes of allowing the U. S. Atomic Veteran Community to speak, with a single voice, to their inability to get a fair hearing related to their developing ( radiogenic )  health issues  that may have been precipitated by their exposure to “ionizing” radiation while participating in a nuclear weapon test detonation, or a “post-test” event.   From the beginning, and to date, we continue to pursue our purpose to this dedicated cause.”

The NAAV also has an open access Facebook group page at https://www.facebook.com/groups/NationalAssociationofAtomicVeterans/

I’ve been a member of the NAAV’s Yahoo Group since 2009 and have learned much from their discussions at https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/naav/info

Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Veterans Facebook Fan Page was created to publicly share historical information about the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission which is published here at AtomicCleanupVets.com. Our Facebook Fan Page can be found at https://www.facebook.com/AtomicCleanupVeterans

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include all Marshall Island Atomic Cleanup Veterans in the U.S. Government Veterans Administration’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Introducing Our Supporters – Lisa Villa

Lisa Villa LD 1487

 

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

State Representative Lisa Villa of Maine is our group’s first political supporter. She’s not the first political supporter who has fought for atomic cleanup veterans’ rights and failed. She is OUR GROUP’s first political supporter since Gary Pulis created our Facebook Group July 4, 2012.

I learned she took an interest in our difficulties while talking with Atomic Cleanup Veteran Paul Laird.

Paul tells me that Lisa was getting her car serviced at his family’s business recently and he got to talking about Enewetak and his health challenges.

Paul was one of the bull dozier operators who cleared an island of vegetation and contaminated soils so the Lojwa Base Camp could be built to house soldiers that would scrape and pick up as much radioactive soils and debris as directed by the guys in radiation suits holding Geiger Counters.

Paul worked ten hour days six days a week covered with contaminated soils. The wind carried dust from his dozier’s bucket from the time he scraped the soils until he placed it in the dump trucks. He says by the end of the day, all you could see were the whites of his eyes and his teeth if he smiled.

Jungle boots, socks, short pants, t-shirt, jungle shirt and hat was his standard uniform. Nothing worn to protect him from the dusty contaminated soils from going into his mouth or nose. He was told painter’s masks were on back order.

Paul says his medical chart lists challenges with Renal cell carcinoma in his kidney, situ carcinoma in his bladder, hearing loss, diabetes, and high blood pressure even though he looks to be in good physical shape!

Lisa Villa not only took the time to listen to Paul’s story, but Lisa took the time to befriend our group and pay attention to our challenges. She took notes and got others involved.

Then, she mentioned the Enewetak Atoll Cleanup Mission Veterans’ struggles during her speech at the Maine State House of Representatives floor debate of LD 1487. “An Act to Implement Managed Care in the MaineCare Program”.


 

Thank you Lisa Villa!

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include all Marshall Island Atomic Cleanup Veterans in the U.S. Government Veterans Administration’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Thanks goes to Paul Laird for sharing his experiences at Enewetak Atoll and his conversations with Lisa Villa.

High praise goes to Lisa Villa for not only taking an interest in our plight, but standing up and talking about it with politicians who can help her help us.

Much appreciation goes to Andrea Parkinston for capturing Lisa Villa’s speech and posting it on her YouTube channel.

Credit goes to Bridgton Library for publishing Lisa Villa’s speech in their Newsletter.

Our Atomic Health

Veterans Health Initiative Veterans and Radiation - Revised Independent Study Course Released: August 2004. Sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs - Employee Education System

Veterans Health Initiative Veterans and Radiation – Revised Independent Study Course Released: August 2004. Sponsored by the Department of Veterans Affairs – Employee Education System

 

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times of our declining health.

As much as we appreciate our health practitioners, not every doctor, nurse, nor medical technician is experienced with identifying nor treating patients with illnesses caused by exposure to radiation.

The Veterans Administration published a 5 hour continuing education coursebook in an effort to help health practitioners who have Atomic Veterans as patients.

The 2004 Clinical Education Guide (Veterans Health Initiative) is called Veterans and Radiation.

It is mainly focused on understanding health issues of the Atomic Vets who participated in the 1944-1958 Atomic Testing and at Japan’s two bomb sites.

However, it would be naive to believe none of these health issues could apply to the soldiers who cleaned up radioactive debris and fallout from the tests at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Many of the atomic cleanup participants breathed and ingested radiation contaminated dust on a daily basis for 5-1/2 months at a time. Some of us participated in more than one tour and served for longer periods of time.

We had a mission. We bonded. We did our jobs. We served. Now we have health issues. Some of our family members have inherited health issues.

Encourage your health practitioners to download and read the very specific information regarding heath care of veterans exposed to radiation.

But before you share it with them, download and read it for your own knowledge. Pay particular attention to the Presumptive List of Cancers due to exposure to IR in service on page 57 of the PDF document.

I am in awe of F. Lincoln Grahlfs’ recollection of his exposure to radiation after the end of the war and the challenges he experienced while trying to get the VA to help him and his family. Many of his challenges of dealing with the military and congress as an Atomic Veteran is very similar to our difficulties and feelings as Atomic Cleanup Vets. His observations and statistics are equally impressive.

We can change our situation by continuing to share information and encouraging others to do the same.

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include us in the U.S. Government’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 Atomic Debris Cleanup Participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) of the 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Source material content for this article was found on websites owned by the Veterans Administration.

Our Original Mission

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We are but a few of the Survivors of the Civilians, Government Employees and Soldiers in the Army, Air Force, and Navy who participated in the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our Original Mission was to move radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll to a 370 foot diameter concrete containment structure on Runit Island and to create a number of artificial reefs in the lagoon.

Our three year mission allowed the dri-Enewetak Islanders to return to almost all of the 40 islands in their beautiful homeland of Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

The U.S. Government evacuated Enewetak Atoll of its inhabitants shortly after the end of World War II so the atoll could be used as a major proving ground for the U.S. Government’s Atomic Bomb Testing of over 40 atomic bombs during the 1940’s and 1950’s.

In March 1974, the United States Energy Research and Development Administration published Radiological Conditions at Enewetak Atoll and Protection of Future Residents.It was written in both Marshallese and English languages so the dri-Enewetak people could understand the challenges of the cleanup and the changes in their lifestyles when they were allowed to return to their atoll.

After our mission was completed, a narrative history of the Radiological Cleanup of Enewetak Atoll was published by the Defense Nuclear Agency with a Forward written by Vice Admiral Robert R. Monroe, U. S. Navy and Director of the Defense Nuclear Agency. It was complied from historical documents stored in the Enewetak Radiological Cleanup Repository at the Defense Nuclear Agency’s Field Command in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

Both of the above reports are great resources for learning more about our original mission in 1970-1980.

Learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories written by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Our Current Mission

Participants of the Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission built this 55' high 370' diameter 2' thick concrete containment structure and filled it with 109,840 cubic yards of radioactive soil and debris.

Participants of the Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission built this 55′ high 370′ diameter 2′ thick concrete containment structure and filled it with 109,840 cubic yards of radioactive soil and debris.

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

By obtaining this goal, we will be eligible to apply for funds set-aside for those who experience health complications due to radiation exposure at Enewetak Atoll.

Atomic Debris Cleanup Participants are not included in the U.S. Government’s definition because “Congress has not created any presumptions for veterans or civilians based on residual contamination of nuclear tests at Enewetak Atoll.”

We served our county by participating in the Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission. The Marshallese People have returned to their homeland. The U.S. Government awarded us Humanitarian Medals for our efforts and we appreciate their praise.

However, many of our survivors and their families have health challenges that are not inexpensive. The Justice Department has ruled for medical funds to be available for those who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service, but Congress has refused to include cleanup participants in that definition.

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include us in the U.S. Government’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Source material content for this article was found on websites owned by GovPulse and the Government Printing Office.