Request a Speaker from our Atomic Cleanup Veterans Speakers Bureau

5/20/17 Operation Stand Together Sylvan Theater National Mall Washington DC D.C. Atomic Cleanup Vets Veterans Keith Kiefer

Photo courtesy of Carrie Diem Keith Kiefer

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands. 

Our Original Mission was to relocate and entomb radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands in the Marshall Islands.

We accomplished our Humanitarian Mission in 1980. Some of us have health challenges related to cleaning up radiation produced by 43 atomic bombs tested in the Pacific Proving Grounds during the Cold War’s Atomic Test Program. Some of us have died.

Most of our Veterans are very open about their first-hand-experiences from the cleanup mission and the health consequinces they’ve encountered because of their exposure to ionizing radiation.

Unfortunately, too many people turn a deaf ear and ignore our need to change the law that classifies us as having “ocupational exposure” to radiation instead of “at-risk” exposure.

We recently formed a Speakers Bureau of Atomic Cleanup Veterans available to speak at various organizational events all across the United States.

Many of our members have already been interviewed by news reporters and book authors. Some of our guys have already spoken with various organizations whose members are not only interested in the history and consequinces of our mission, but are actively supporting our current mission of getting HR632 Mark Takai’s Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act signed into law.

If your Organization has a meeting or a special event and is interested in an Atomic Cleanup Veteran to speak about our Atomic Cleanup Mission and how your organization can help us change the law prohibiting Atomic Cleanup Veterans from obtaining the same healthcare available to Atomic Veterans, please fill in your request on the form below.

You can help us change our “occupational” exposure classification to “at-risk” exposure by letting your Federal Representatives know you want them to support H.R. 632 – Mark Takai’s Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories shared by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Application to become a Member of our Speakers Bureau

5/20/17 Operation Stand Together Sylvan Theater National Mall Washington DC D.C. Atomic Cleanup Vets Veterans Harry Daniel Lojwa Animals

Photo courtesy of Carrie Diem ACV Harry Daniel

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands. 

Our Original Mission was to relocate and entomb radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands in the Marshall Islands.

We accomplished our Humanitarian Mission in 1980. Some of us have health challenges related to cleaning up radiation produced by 43 atomic bombs tested in the Pacific Proving Grounds during the Cold War’s Atomic Test Program. Some of us have died.

Many of our Veterans are very open about their first-hand-experiences from the cleanup mission and the health consequinces they’ve encountered because of their exposure to ionizing radiation.

Unfortunately, too many people turn a deaf ear and ignore our need to change the law that classifies us as having “ocupational exposure” to radiation instead of “at-risk” exposure.

We recently formed a Speakers Bureau of Atomic Cleanup Veterans available to speak at various organizational events all across the United States.

Many of our members have already been interviewed by news reporters and book authors. Some of our guys have already spoken with various organizations whose members are not only interested in the history and consequinces of our mission, but are actively supporting our current mission of getting HR632 Mark Takai’s Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act signed into law.

If you are an Atomic Cleanup Veteran who is interested in speaking about our Atomic Cleanup Mission at organizations who can help us change the law prohibiting Atomic Cleanup Veterans from obtaining the same healthcare available to Atomic Veterans, please fill in the application below.

You can help us change our “occupational” exposure classification to “at-risk” exposure by letting your Federal Representatives know you want them to support H.R. 632 – Mark Takai’s Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories shared by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

How Close do You live to Atomic Cleanup Veterans?

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands. 

Our Original Mission was to relocate and entomb radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands in the Marshall Islands.

We accomplished our Humanitarian Mission in 1980. Some of us have health challenges related to cleaning up radiation produced by 43 atomic bombs tested in the Pacific Proving Grounds during the Cold War’s Atomic Test Program. Some of us have died.

Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission Participants came from military units stationed all over the world.

As a result, our known survivors roster shows Atomic Cleanup Veterans scattered all over Earth.

Our group of Forgotten Veterans live surprisingly close to each other and to many patriotic supporters.

Many of our Veterans are very open about their first-hand-experiences from the cleanup mission and the health consequinces they’ve encountered because of their exposure to ionizing radiation.

Unfortunately, too many people turn a deaf ear and ignore our need to change the law that classifies us as having “ocupational exposure” to radiation instead of “at-risk” exposure.

We recently formed a Speakers Bureau of Atomic Cleanup Veterans available to speak at various organizational events all across the United States.

Many of our members have already been interviewed by news reporters and book authors. Some of our guys have already spoken with various organizations whose members are not only interested in the history and consequinces of our mission, but are actively supporting our current mission of getting HR632 Mark Takai’s Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act signed into law.

If you are a patriotic supporter of Our Nation’s Veterans and are interested in hearing how Your Organization can help change the law prohibiting Atomic Cleanup Veterans from obtaining the same healthcare available to Atomic Veterans, please contact us and let us know.

In the meantime, give in to your curiousity and see how many Atomic Cleanup Veterans live near you. Zoom in on this map showing the current locations of the known survivors from our mission at Enewetak Atoll:

You can help us change our “occupational” exposure classification to “at-risk” exposure by letting your Federal Representatives know you want them to support H.R. 632 – Mark Takai’s Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories shared by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Memorial Day

5/20/17 Operation Stand Together Sylvan Theater National Mall Washington DC D.C. Atomic Cleanup Vets Veterans

Photo courtesy of Carrie Diem

Memorial Day is a federal holiday in the United States for remembering the people who died while serving in the country’s armed forces. Many people visit cemeteries and memorials, particularly to honor those who have died in military service.

Today, we want to pay our respects to the Fallen Soldiers, Airmen and Sailors who died during or after participating in the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission.

Please take a moment to review the list of our Known Fallen Atomic Cleanup Veterans in silent respect for their humanitarian sacrifice for the dri-Enewetak while serving in our armed forces.

If you know of any Fallen Humanitarians from the Atomic Cleanup Mission, who are not listed, please add their names and known information in the form.

 

25 March 2016 Status of Survivors Roster Report

12810031_162936954095238_837343451_o

 

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands. 

Our Original Mission was to relocate and entomb radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands in the Marshall Islands.

We accomplished our Humanitarian Mission in 1980. Currently, some of us have health challenges related to cleaning up radiation produced by 43 atomic bombs tested in the Pacific Proving Grounds during the Cold War’s Atomic Test Program.

On May 6th 2014, we started collecting information about our health challenges.

As of 25 March 2016, we have 342 responses to our survey.

 

In response to who was your employer during the Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission the answers are as follows:

  • According to The Radiological Cleanup of Enewetak Atoll published by the Defense Nuclear Agency in 1981, 8,033 people were involved in the 1977 – 1980 Mission. The response vs total participants breakdown is as follows:
    • 282 of the 2670 Army participants responded (10.6%).
    • 74 of the 2207 Navy participants responded (3.4%).
    • 46 of the 740 Air Force participants responded (6.2%).
    • 5 of the 1011 DOE & Contractor participants responded (0.5%).
    • 0 of the 597 DOI/TTPI participants responded (0%).
    • 8 of the 246 DNA/JTG participants responded (3.3%).
    • 0 of the 49 Journalist participants responded (0%).
    • 3 of the 513 Others participants responded (0.6%).
    • 418 of the 8033 Total Participants Responded (5.2%).

In response to which island did you live on while at Enewetak Atoll, the answers are as follows:

  • 251 lived on Enewetak Island (62%).
  • 147 lived on Lojwa Island (38%).
  • A total of 408 replied to this question.

In response to the Health Challenges believed to be due to exposure to Ionized Radiation during the Mission, 348 responded.

  • 201 claim health challenges are due to Radiation Exposure (58%).
  • 147 claim no health challenges due to Radiation Exposure (42%).

In response to Veterans Administration Assistance Status, 352 responded.

  • 101 reported they are receiving VA Health Assistance.
  • 30 reported they have pending VA Health Assistance Claims.
  • 149 reported they have no need for VA Health Assistance.
  • 79 reported “Other” as their VA Health Assistance Status.

We appreciate each and every Atomic Cleanup Veteran who helped our readers get a clearer view of the background and current status/consequences reported by participants of our Humanitarian Mission.

You can help us change our “occupational” exposure classification to “at-risk” exposure by letting your Federal Representatives know you want them to support Hawaii’s Rep. Mark Takai’s Bill H.R. 3870 Atomic Veterans Healthcare Parity Act.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories shared by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Atomic Cleanup Help Wanted

DNA-Patch

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our Original Mission was to relocate radioactive fallout and debris from the surface of the islands of Enewetak Atoll so the dri-Enewetak Islanders could return to their beautiful homeland of 40 Islands at Enewetak Atoll in the Marshall Islands.

Atomic Cleanup Help Wanted – The Defense Nuclear Agency is looking for personnel required to clean up radioactive debris and soils contaminating 40 islands in the Marshall Islands located in a remote area of the Pacific Ocean known from 1946 – 1958 as the Pacific Proving Grounds for the U.S. Nuclear Test Era directed by the Atomic Energy Commission.
Forty-three atomic bombs were tested at Enewetak Atoll leaving behind radioactive fallout and debris from over 1100 megatons of yield created by detonating Americium-241, Cesium-137, Cobalt-60, Plutonium-239, Plutonium-240, Strontium-90 and other radioactive elements.
One hour accumulated background radiation levels vary depending on said island. Three of the 40 islands show 62,849 R/h on Runit Island, 3,501 R/h on Enjebi Island, and 651 R/h at the Lojwa Island Base Camp.
The Defense Nuclear Agency has been authorized by the U.S. Federal Government to hire personnel from government approved private sector contractors, various federal government agencies, a government approved marine biology lab, and volunteers from current members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Coast Guard. No hazardous duty pay will be provided. No special health insurance shall be provided. A modest per Diem pay (less daily expenses) shall be provided. Military Transportation shall be provided. Housing (IE: tents with cots, temporary structures with metal bunk-beds and wall lockers, furnished trailers, furnished permanent structures) shall be provided. Meals shall be provided. Laundry shall be provided. Limited medical care shall be provided.
Participants are expected to work ten to twelve hour days, six days a week for the average 179 day assignment. Radiation protective gear (IE: none, painters masks, gas masks, or full radiation suits and equipment) shall be provided.
Amenities include living on at least one of the secluded tropical islands with fantastic views of starlit skies, Pacific Ocean sunrises and Enewetak Atoll’s beautiful lagoon sunsets. Free waterfront activities include: 24 hour day or night waterfront walks or sitting on the beach, watching the waves, collecting shells, watching sea-life (IE: sharks, dolphins, whales, flying fish, parrot-fish, lobsters, etc), fishing for sharks, swimming, snorkeling, scuba diving, spearfishing, 12′ sunfish sailing, catamaran sailing, military boat and helicopter rides.) Other amenities may or may not include: retail stores, outdoor theaters, local broadcast television, local broadcast radio, USO Shows, baseball games, jogging, weight lift equipment, barbershop, pool tables, clubhouses, outdoor grilling, rat stomping and lots of parties.
Other than the provided postal mail system, opportunities to converse with families and friends will be rare. No family members will be allowed to visit. All information about the atomic cleanup mission shall remain confidential until an undisclosed date.
Applicants shall be aware that this mission is the last and final stage of the Atomic Test Program which began as the Manhattan Project and is a part of the Human Radiation Experiment Program.
Job positions required include but is not limited to radiation testing personnel, construction skilled and semi-skilled laborers who will locate and hand carry radioactive debris to one of several designated areas for disposal, concrete workers, framers, plumbers, electricians, machinists, heavy equipment operators, dump truck operators, boat operators, helicopter crew members, demolition experts, explosive ordinance experts, crane operators, LARC crew members, medical staff, cafeteria staff, supply personnel, laundry staff, security personnel, operations and administrative personnel.
Applicants shall be contacted by their employers or military superiors for an opportunity to volunteer or will be voluntold to participate in this confidential mission. Upon completion of the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission, most participants (including state side personnel required to record radiation readings from urine samples collected from cleanup participants) shall be awarded the Humanitarian Medal from the U.S. Government as a gesture of thanks for putting yourself in harms way while preparing the islands for the return of the people who lived at Enewetak Atoll before the atomic tests began.
Please be aware that although most health complications caused by exposure to ionized radiation may not be detected for up to 30 to 50 years after exposure, no long term health care studies will be provided after your participation of the mission. Classified documents including personnel records, health records, radiation records, and other documents will be maintained by the U.S. Federal Government and will not be accessible or will have limited access in the future.

The above advertisement is a piece of pure fiction. It was never posted by anyone or any government agency prior to this publication. It was written as if the truth in advertising and full disclosure were standard operational procedures and was practiced for classified government and military operations.

The content however, is closer to the truth than what was commonly disclosed prior to most volunteering or being “voluntold” to participate in the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission.

I was one of the few from the 8,000+ participants who volunteered. In fact, I volunteered twice for a total of 14 months at Enewetak Atoll. Most of the Atomic Cleanup Veterans were voluntold to participate in the mission.

I’m one of the lucky veterans who served at the atoll with limited health complications. I’ve met many who are struggling with health challenges. Our roster survey shows about one-third state they have no health challenges. However, two-thirds believe we are experiencing health challenges due to our exposure to ionizing radiation.

The government refuses to admit our exposure to radiation during the cleanup mission was considered a “radiation-risk” activity. The government continues to state our exposure to radiation was “occupational” in nature.

Please write your federal representative and let them know you support our efforts to change the current laws by including the 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Veterans as Atomic Veterans (as defined in RECA) as experiencing radiation risk exposure to radiation.

Continue to learn more about us from various resources shared by supporters and cleanup participants in future AtomicCleanupVets.com articles. Our articles contain photographs, videos, documents and stories written by the actual participants who cleaned radioactive contaminated soils and materials from the surface of the islands at Enewetak Atoll.

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 (14 month) participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.

Our Current Mission is to help health challenged Atomic Cleanup Veterans become included in the Veterans Administration’s definition of an Atomic Veteran so we can qualify to apply for funds set aside for veterans “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Exposure Awareness

 

We are but a few of the Survivors of the 1977-1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Debris Cleanup Mission in the Marshall Islands.

Our main focus is to help each other with information and moral support during challenging times.

Our secondary focus is to urge Congress to change the current laws and recognize soldiers of the cleanup mission as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Exposure Awareness is more commonly known in the business world as Public Relations.

Exposure Awareness is a key factor for our group of Atomic Cleanup Veterans to become recognised as “veterans who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service or while members of reserve components during active duty for training or inactive duty training.”

Currently, all military veterans who participated in The 1977 – 1980 Enewetak Atoll Atomic Cleanup Mission are defined by the Veterans Administration as Occupational Radiation Exposed Veterans.

We do not believe the manual laborers and heavy equipment operators who moved radioactive debris by hand and equipment with next to no radiation protection should be considered as having “Occupational” exposure to radiation.

More and more of us are speaking out in an attempt to “get the word out” so our group of Atomic Cleanup Veterans can be recognised as working in radiation-risk activities while cleaning up after the 44 Atomic Bombs that scattered radiation over Enewetak Atoll during the Cold War.

We have already achieved much Exposure Awareness by creating a Facebook Group and a Facebook Fan Page in addition to creating the AtomicCleanupVets.com website.

One of easiest ways of increasing Exposure Awareness is to share information from our AtomicCleanupVets.com website on social networks like Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, and Google+. Sharing our pages is easy when you use the sharing feature you find near the bottom of each webpage.

Commenting on international and national news and magazine websites is another method for increasing Exposure Awareness. The main rule of thumb is to not spam them by commenting on articles that have nothing to do with our struggles with the Veterans Administration.

There are plenty of internet articles about the Veterans Administration, the Marshall Islands, Enewetak Atoll, Nuclear Disarmament, Radiation Risks, etc… to comment upon.

Most of those websites give you the ability to include a link to a website (like AtomicCleanupVets.com) within your comments or membership profile. I believe if they give you the opportunity, then by all means, add the link to our website.

I also believe everyone who comments on articles should have a profile photo of themselves instead of a silhouette or whatever random image a website shows when you do not have a profile photo. A photo of yourself makes readers feel like you are a person they can trust.

Gravatar.com offers an excellant service that will automatically show a photo of your choice when you comment on website articles. It is free and quick to create. If you use more than one email address, you can use a different photo for each of your email addresses.

I encourage everyone to watch this video introduction about Gravatar and take a few minutes to create your own international profile:


 Now, go find your favorite webpage at AtomicCleanupVets.com and share it in your comments on one of the major news websites who have posted articles you feel are good places to increase Exposure Awareness about Atomic Cleanup Veterans.

We urge our supporters to encourage their politicians to create legislation which will include all Marshall Island Atomic Cleanup Veterans in the U.S. Government Veterans Administration’s definition of a veteran “who participated in radiation-risk activities during active service.”

Article written by Girard Frank Bolton, III. 1977-1979 participant with C Company and HHC S-3 (Operations) 84th Engineer Battalion (Combat Heavy) (Fwd) Enewetak Atoll, Marshall Islands.